Stop Cyber Martial Law

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I am against Republic Act 10175 which denies Filipinos the right to free speech on the Internet.

We are a better country than this. We deserve better.

And if you continue to do this to us, we will fight.

Join the protest:

More info:

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10th Anniversary

It’s been 10 years since February 19, 1999, easily the one night that changed my life forever:

Corny, but true – I can trace my entire adult life back to this moment. Voice of Our Youth was the reason I got drafted by a political party at the university (even before the first day of freshman year!), which led to me being in student politics for three years, which landed me a job in game development (originally there were no openings available, but the boss was from the same political party and so he gave me another chance).

If you believe in parallel universes, somewhere out there is a Luna who DIDN’T win that night, or didn’t join at all – I wonder what she’d be doing now. She’s probably not a game developer. Maybe she’d be in law, or in film, or something. And she’s probably afraid of speaking in front of crowds. In any case, I am happy and grateful that life turned out the way it did.

Thanks to Eigen, my crazy genius of a runner-up, for reminding me of our 10th anniversary 😉 Cheers!

Obama Wins

Obama

I’ve been watching CNN all morning. When they announced that Barack Obama would be the next president of the United States, I started crying. It’s insane! I’m not even American! And people who know me will tell you that I’m not a very “political” person. Sure, when I was in college, I was political party president – but I saw first-hand how dirty and desperate politics could be. “If this is what college politics was,” I remember thinking, “then real-world politics must be a million times worse.” After I graduated, I stopped taking interest in national politics altogether. Our presidents were ousted and reinstated, tried and impeached and freed, promised and dealed and lied… and I stopped caring.

At the same time, in college, I saw how inspiring politics could be to some people. When I remember the kids I trained and led while I was president, I’m still overwhelmed with pride. Several of them now are leaders in their own fields, and I know that the principles we believed in then are still driving them to do good things now. But I have never been inspired again. Not until Obama.

So for the past few weeks, I found myself watching the US presidential and vice-presidential debates. Hell, I don’t even watch CNN -now I was checking it every day. I developed an admiration for Obama and Biden and a distaste for McCain and Palin. (I don’t want any flames – I’m just saying I picked a side.) And though I have never identified with the United States, unlike many millions of Filipinos who believe it is the Greener Grass, I have traveled to the US almost every year and experienced, as an outsider, both its successes and failures as a nation.  And I’d considered living in the US for three years to study, so maybe this election would have affected me directly. But now, while I am safely in the Philippines and should be doing many other things this morning, I am instead glued to CNN and marveling at this historic hour.

I am happy for the United States that they will have Obama as president. Now, Philippines, will you please give us somebody to believe in too?